The Common (Indian) Myna Pictures and Detail (Acridotheres tristis)

Common Myna, Indian Myna, Myna,
A Pair of a Common Myna 

The Common (Indian) Myna Pictures and Detail (Acridotheres tristis)


As the name suggests, this bird is very common in India and it is one of the most invasive birds in the present world. Common Myna is one such bird which makes her presence felt to you by coming very close to humans. 

In India, we can find this bird in big number with other species and subspecies of it. Common or Indian Myna is one bird about which maximum number of people must have knowledge that they exist because they are everywhere and they have best adapted themselves to the urban lifestyle. 

Common Myna, Close Up
Close up Common Myna

The scientific name of these birds is Acridotheres Tristis and they belong to the Sturnidae family of birds. Common Myna is native birds of Asia; however, now this bird is found in most parts of the world and in Australia, it is declared a threat to biodiversity.

The main food of common myna is insects, human waste, seeds, grains, small reptiles, small mammals and fruits. With so long list of food, Common myna can survive anywhere, therefore, we find them now everywhere.

In my home, they come very often to take some share from the dog food, sometimes, when the dog doesn't eat his food, then this time is like a party for common Myna.

Common Myna, Dog Food,
Common Myna Looking for Dog Food

We can find this bird alone, in pairs, in groups or in mixed groups. It is common to see them walking to go close to food or to catch insects. Being declared an invasive species, its population is to decrease in some countries like Singapore.

Common Myna,
Close Up Two Common Myna
These birds are called flying rats in Australia because of their habits similar to rats. Though, they are helpful bids like crows and clean all human waste.

Some people also put common Myna in cages because of its sweet voice and speaking ability.

Common Myna
Common Myna
Sometimes, Common (Indian) Myna poses threat to other birds by displacing them from their natives nest. These birds fit best on the example of survival of the fittest.

All pics by Arvind Katoch

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